Cognitive, Computational, and Systems Neuroscience Training Program

The training program in Cognitive, Computational, and Systems Neuroscience (CCSN) is sponsored by the University of Oregon Institute of Neuroscience, the nation's first research institute of its kind. In keeping with the innovative origins of the Institute, the CCSN program provides a rare opportunty for graduate students to forge experimental and theoretical links between systems and cognitive neuroscience while becoming experts in their field of choice. We believe that such interdisciplinary training positions our graduates to become leaders in the growing field of integrative and behavioral neuroscience.

The heart of our program is thesis research. Twenty eight faculty members drawn from the departments of Biology and Psychology serve as research mentors and instructors. These researchers use a wide range of approaches including molecular biology, genetics, electrophysiology, optogenetics, functional brain imaging, and computational neuroscience to tackle fundamental questions in the neuronal basis of perception, behavior, memory, and cognition. CCSN faculty study not only humans but a wide range of model organsims including C. elegans, Drosophila, zebrafish, and mouse.

When not "at the bench," trainees follow a customizable course of study that leads from a year-long graduate core course to a variety of elective courses that allow students to go deeper into their specialty. In addition to course work, trainees learn in a variety of interactive settings including lab meetings, journal clubs, seminars, bi-monthly research-in-progress meetings, and institute retreats. These activities, together with a culture of openness and engagement among CCSN faculty members, create a degree of cohesiveness that sets CCSN apart from programs at other universities.

Participating Faculty

SYSTEMS AND COMPUTATIONAL NEUROSCIENCE
Yashar Ahmadian, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Biology
Theoretical neuroscience
Chris Doe, Ph.D. 
Professor, Department of Biology
Assembly and function of neural circuits driving larval locomotion in Drosophila.
Ian Greenhouse, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Human Physiology
Human Motor Control.
Tory Herman, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor, Department of Biology
Genetics of synapse formation in the Drosophila visual system.
Adrienne Huxtable, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Human Physiology
Neural Control of Breathing.

Shawn Lockery, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Biology
Neuronal basis of spatial orientation behaviors in C. elegans.

Luca Mazzucato, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Biology
Computational models of cortical network function.

David A. McCormick, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Biology
Cortical and Subcorical Circuits of Decision, Performance, and Neuromodulatory State.
Adam Miller, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Biology
Neural circuit wiring, synapse formation, and electrical synaptogenesis in zebrafish.
Cris Niell, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Biology
Function and development of neural circuits for visual processing
Matt Smear, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology
Systems neuroscience.
Nicki Swann, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Human Physiology
Human Motor Control.
Emily Sylwestrak, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Biology
Habenular Circuits of Reward and Addiction.
Terry Takahashi, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Biology
Coding and integration of sensory information from a neuroethological perspective.
Philip Washbourne, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Biology
Molecular mechanisms of synapse formation and its relationship to behavior.
Michael Wehr, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology
Encoding and transformation of sensory information in auditory cortex.
COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
Elliot Berkman, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology
Behavioral, motivational, and neural systems involved in self-regulation and goal pursuit.
Paul Dassonville, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor, Department of Psychology
Mental representations of sensory cues and object location in three-dimensional space.
Sarah Dubrow, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology
Learning and Memory.
Phil Fisher, Ph.D. 
Professor, Department of Psychology
Prevention research, stress neurobiology, foster care and school readiness.
Brice Kuhl, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology
Cognitive Neuroscience, Memory, Cognitive Control, fMRI Methods
Ulrich Mayr, Ph.D. 
Professor, Department of Psychology
Cognitive control and decision making.
Jennifer Pfeifer, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology
Neural and behavioral correlates of normative and atypical socioemotional development.
Margaret Sereno, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor, Department of Psychology
Neural basis of perception and cognition using experimental and computational approaches
Nash Unsworth, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology
Role of memory and attention in higher-order cognition.
Dasa Zeithamova, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology
Cognitive-Neuroscience and memory.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course of Study

The CCSN program draws those students from the departments of Biology and Psychology who wish to concentrate in cognitive, computational, and/or systems neuroscience. Trainees follow a course of study that prepares them to design, conduct, and analyze the results of experiments at the leading edge of the field. Learn more. 

Financial Support

Students who make satisfactory progress toward their degree routinely receive support from the time they join the program until they receive their Ph.D. Stipend levels are adjusted annually to be competitive with those offered by other major research institutions. Sources of support include research assistantships, graduate teaching fellowships, and federally supported training grants.

Application Process

Students interested in pursuing graduate studies in the Systems, Computational, and Cognitive Neuroscience training program are admitted through one of the two participating departments, Biology and Psychology.

  BIOLOGY PSYCHOLOGY
PROCEDURES More Info More Info
DEADLINE December 1 December 1
FURTHER INFORMATION

Graduate Program Manager

Jessica Wilson

wilson21@uoregon.edu

Department of Biology
1210 Univeristy of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403-1210

541-346-4503

BIOLOGY APPLICATION

Graduate Secretary

Department of Psychology
1227 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403-1227

541-346-5060

PSYCHOLOGY APPLICATION

Local Community

Eugene is a livable and inexpensive city with great outdoor activities, a thriving local food culture, and a lively arts scene. Learn more.

Contact

MAIN OFFICE COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE SYSTEMS NEUROSCIENCE

Institute of Neuroscience
222 Huestis Hall
1254 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403-1254

541-346-3191

Ulrich Mayr

Department of Psychology
Institute of Neuroscience
343 Straub Hall
Eugene, OR 97403
541-346-4905
 

David McCormick

Institute of Neuroscience
233 Huestis Hall
1254 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403-1254

davidmc@uoregon.edu