Michael Posner

Professor Emeritus, Department of Psychology
Member, ION

Ph.D. University of Michigan
M.S. University of Washington
B.S. University of Washington

mposner@uoregon.edu 
Lab Website
Office: 433 Straub
Phone: 541-346-4939

 

Research Interests: Cognitive-Neuroscience; Neural mechanisms and structures underlying selective attention

Overview: Michael Posner is Professor Emeritus at the University of Oregon and Adjunct Professor at the Weill Medical College in New York (Sackler Institute).

Dr. Posner's current work deals with genetic and experiential factors in the development of brain networks underlying attention and learning. We are currently examining how changes in white matter might contribute to improved performance.  In one study conducted together with the Niell lab we are imposing a theta rhythm on cells in the anterior cingulate of the mouse and examining whether the resultant activity leads to improved myelination in pathways near the cingulate.   We are also examining if epigenetic factors related to methylation might account for individual differences in this process.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

Related Articles

Temperament and brain networks of attention.

Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2018 Apr 19;373(1744):

Authors: Posner MI, Rothbart MK

Abstract
The attention networks of the human brain are important control systems that develop from infancy into adulthood. While they are common to everyone, they differ in efficiency, forming the basis of individual differences in attention. We have developed methods for measuring the efficiency of these networks in older children and adults and have also examined their development from infancy. During infancy the alerting and orienting networks are dominant in control of the infant's actions, but later an executive network dominates. Each network has been associated with its main neuromodulator and these have led to associations with genes related to that network neuromodulator. The links between parent reports of their child's effortful control and the executive attention network allow us to associate molecular mechanisms to fundamental behavioural outcomes.This article is part of the theme issue 'Diverse perspectives on diversity: multi-disciplinary approaches to taxonomies of individual differences'.

PMID: 29483356 [PubMed - in process]

Related Articles

Diversity in action: exchange of perspectives and reflections on taxonomies of individual differences.

Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2018 Apr 19;373(1744):

Authors: Uher J, Trofimova I, Sulis W, Netter P, Pessoa L, Posner MI, Rothbart MK, Rusalov V, Peterson IT, Schmidt LA

Abstract
Throughout the last 2500 years, the classification of individual differences in healthy people and their extreme expressions in mental disorders has remained one of the most difficult challenges in science that affects our ability to explore individuals' functioning, underlying psychobiological processes and pathways of development. To facilitate analyses of the principles required for studying individual differences, this theme issue brought together prominent scholars from diverse backgrounds of which many bring unique combinations of cross-disciplinary experiences and perspectives that help establish connections and promote exchange across disciplines. This final paper presents brief commentaries of some of our authors and further scholars exchanging perspectives and reflecting on the contributions of this theme issue.This article is part of the theme issue 'Diverse perspectives on diversity: multi-disciplinary approaches to taxonomies of individual differences'.

PMID: 29483355 [PubMed - in process]